Monday, 13 February 2017

Mogersdorf and a forgotten outdoor exhibition

Hello,

I have started a little project in which I am going through my photo archive and aiming at selecting nice ones for some arty utilisation. It is a hardcore project as I have got over a hundred thousand of digital images on my hard drives, because I, apart from a couple of topics, take pictures of everything without an actual conception. This is why it is worth having a look at photographs in these old folders where I often find treasures. Last night I had a spare hour, so I thought I would look at a folder that has thousands of photos from 2009 and I found one that was labelled 'Mogersdorf' and dated the 5th September 2009.

Mogersdorf, or also known as Nagyfalva in Hungarian or Modinci in Slovenian, is a small village near Jennersdorf in Eastern Austria (Burgenland). (Click here for a map.) It is a famous place as it was here that Raimondo Montecuccoli fought the Battle of Szentgotthárd (or Battle of Mogersdorf) against the Ottoman Empire in 1664. The place is literally situated on the other side of the Hungarian-Austrian border, and if you drive westerly from the Hungarian town of Szentgotthárd, you will see a massive cross on a hill-top which is the monument of this historic battle (Picture 1).

Picture 1: Stonecross of Schösslberg (click to enlarge)
Photo by Bokor, L. (2009)

The pictures that I found in this folder are, however, not of Mogersdorf which is great; because, apart from a couple of things, it is a boring little place. But on that day I was there, I found a mini exhibition of artwork posters on the top of the hill, just by the cross. 14 to be exact and these artworks were themed: globalisation and peace (Picture 2)

Picture 2: Mini exhibition on Schlößlberg (click to enlarge)
Photo by Bokor, L. (2009)

They are reflective, poignant, and provocative, so they are amazing! As a researcher, I find these images important as I deal with issues in a local and global context; therefore, they have a lot to tell us about the world and the society we live in. 

I took pictures of all 14 images, but for some reason, I did not take one of the description panel itself. What a shame! Because now I have no idea who exactly did these artworks (though some could be identified as they are signed and dated) and where they are from, and why these were displayed in Mogersdorf. I tried to do a little research on it, but I have not been able to sink into the subject and find any details of this exhibition. Fortunately, I have the pictures of the artworks and I am going to share them with you. Hopefully, this post may reach someone who knows more about these artists and their artworks and perhaps we will get some more information on the display itself.  

Please enjoy. Don't rush through the images (click to enlarge).

~ Laszlo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Photos by Bokor, L. (2009)